Your pattern sins (4) — YAHWEH-NISSI

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Philippians 2:5 NIV Achievers: Achievers love to overcome challenges and perform for others. At best, they’re motivated to grow, stretch, and learn. They inspire and move people to action and enjoy being in front of crowds. Giving a talk energizes them. Without a chance to develop and shine they lose their motivation. Achievers want to […]

via Your pattern sins (4) — YAHWEH-NISSI

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Victory – God Cares For Us

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What do you see when you look at the image? The word anxiety seems to have center stage. Life often feels like this image, dark, anxious, and chaotic. That is how Satan wants us to feel.  Gods word is fiighting to get through. The battle rages between Michael, Archangel, and Satan’s demons are fighting over the delivery of our blessings.

The second images’ message prevails – God cares for us. What we see in the natural is not the battle won, but the prevailing war. Our inner eyes (sight through our heavenly eyes) see the victory.

Be victorious today!
Claim victory over your life today!
God sends warrior angels to protect us!
Christ died on the Cross to give us the victory.
Victory is ours!

There is an old hymn, Victory is Mine, by Dorothy Norwood

Victory is mine,
Victory is mine,
Victory today is mine.
I told Satan to get thee behind,
Victory today is mine.
Joy is mine,
Joy is mine,
Joy today is mine
I told Satan to get thee behind,
I know that joy is mine.
Happiness is mine,
Happiness is mine,
Happiness today is mine.
I told Satan to get thee behind,
Happiness today is mine.
Victory today is mine.
I told Satan to get thee behind,
Victory today is mine.
For my thoughts are not your thoughts,neither are your ways my ways.”
Isaiah 55:8 NIV

When the noise becomes so loud, anxiety raises its head, and the darkness becomes blinding in hurricane capacity, remember

GOD CARES FOR US. HE WILL NEVER LEAVE US OR FORSAKE US.
CAST ALL OF YOUR ANXIETIES ON HIM.
VICTORY IS OURS!
Disclaimer – I used the first image to flush out this Post. I did not intend to offend its creator.

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Re-Blog – https://wp.me/p98Coa-D1
Scripture Bible.com; Biblegateway.com, NIV
Images – Google Images
Song Lyrics – Victory Is Mine! Google.com

Thank you for visiting my Young Christian Warriors site and dailyinspiration-lisasthoughts.com.

Remorse, Repentance, and Godly Sorrow

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Godly sorrow

Remorse, repentance and Godly sorrow, are part of the process of maturing in our Christian walk.

How many of us have sinned, and the sin changed our trajectory in life? It may have been at school, work, or in a relationship. The Bible says, we all sin and fall short of the glory of God. Fortunately, we live in the New Testament dispensation, and Jesus died to free us from our sins. Does that mean, we no longer sin? No, it means we are no longer bound by our sins. We, in our humanity – can be remorseful about the event. We can repent for our sin. And, most importantly, we can have Godly sorrow about our sin.

A few days ago, I was listening to Beth Moore’s audiobook, Praying God’s Prayers, and one of the things that stood out was the distinction between remorse, repentance, and Godly sorrow.  My mind (focus) would not leave this topic, I needed to know more and continued to query, what is the difference between the three forms of admission of sin? This is what I learned.

Unpacking the distinction between remorse, repentance, and Godly sorrow

Remorse

Let us begin with remorse, which is defined as a deep and painful regret for wrongdoing. A compunction – a feeling of uneasiness or anxiety by regret for doing wrong or causing pain. Remorse is sadness that primarily focuses on us. We seek forgiveness for our sin, but little more. This type of regret is referred to as worldly sorrow. Worldly sorrow lacks repentance.

10 For the kind of sorrow God wants us to experience leads us away from sin and results in salvation. There’s no regret for that kind of sorrow. But worldly sorrow, which lacks repentance, results in spiritual death.11 Just see what this godly sorrow produced in you! Such earnestness, such concern to clear yourselves, such indignation, such alarm, such longing to see me, such zeal, and such a readiness to punish wrong. You showed that you have done everything necessary to make things right.
2 Corinthians 7:10-11 NLT

When we are remorseful for a sin, which is wrongdoing, we are acting in our carnal nature. It is a human response to our wrongdoing. We acknowledge it and seek forgiveness from the person/s that were affected. The focus is our desire for them to forgive us.

Repentance

When we repent, we ask God for forgiveness for the sin or wrongdoing. True repentance offers forgiveness and places the sin in the “sea of forgetfulness’. This refers to God’s forgiveness, and how when we are justified in Christ, God forgets our sins so completely that they may as well be buried at the bottom of the sea. The crux of repentance is that we ask God to forgive us, and He does, but then we revisit the offense meaning, we have not forgiven ourselves. We failed to turn it over to God. If we believe God, we must forgive ourselves and place the offense at the bottom of the sea, or as far as the east is from the west. In short, we can no longer revisit it.

Question – do we change our course when we repent and continue to replay the sin in our minds? No. We have not given up the thought of the sin, though we may have chosen not to repeat it physically, it stills lives deep within us.

We asked for God’s mercy but did not accept it. In other words, we turned away from the sin but did not turn to God. Our repentance is incomplete. Our sin nature is still active and has not relinquished the sin. Our remorse and regret remain selfish and self-centered. We cry out for justice to relieve our own pain, but not for the pain we have caused others. Worldly sorrow produces death because Satan maintains a hold on us through our selfish cries for redemption. This sorrow falls short of Godly sorrow, in fact, it does not exist in the same universe.

Godly Sorrow

Godly sorrow is when we grieve for those we hurt when we sinned. It is defined as having grief over the sin, rather than the consequences of the sin. Godly sorrow (deep sorrow) is another element of repentance. Godly sorrow is lying prone before God crying out for His forgiveness. Godly sorrow leads to salvation and leaves no room for regret. As the scripture says, it produces earnestness, indignation, alarm, concern, and an acute sense of sadness as the result of the sin. “Godly sorrow is a kind of wretchedness that can bring the repentant sinner to tears of grief.”  (gotQuestions.org). James wrote that “Godly sorrow is the experience of lamenting, grieving, mourning and wailing,” (James 4:8-9). Godly sorrow results from a heartfelt conviction that we have offended God by our sin. When we have Godly sorrow, we resolve within our hearts that we will ‘cease to do evil’ and learn to do good with God’s help.

16 Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes; cease to do evil, 17 learn to do good.
Isaiah 1:16-17 ESV

One of the clearest examples of Godly sorrow can be seen in Luke 7:36-50. In summary, Godly sorrow:

*Draws us to Jesus
*Drives our faith
*Expresses itself externally
*Increases our love for Christ
*Produces assurance of forgiveness* (Five Signs of Godly Sorrow. Ryan Huguley.com)

As we mature as Christians, we move from being remorseful to of asking for repentance and moving into Godly sorrows. Our ultimate goal is to lay our sins before God and plead for his forgiveness and salvation, placing our focus away from the sin and to God. I hope this Post enlightens you, I know the study has provided a greater depth of understanding and has shown me where I have fallen short. I always questioned ‘why’ after repenting did I find myself reliving the sin over and over in my mind. The answer is clear – I did not release the worldly sorrow in exchange for Godly sorrow. The focus remained on me and not on those affected by my sin, or on offending God. I was still reliving the sin in my mind and feeling hurt by the result of the actions, failing to place the focus on others and crying out to God to help those who were hurt. Repentance does not focus on self. Remorse focuses on self. Repentance focuses on those we hurt, and Godly sorrow focuses on having offended God. Godly sorrow leads to salvation.

Godly sorrow is sorrow that is often misunderstood and therefore not executed as part of our repentance and turning away from our sin. Having read this, and pondering over replays of sin, can you now upgrade your repentance to Godly sorrow, turn away from the sin once and for all, place it in the sea of forgetfulness, and turn to God?

psalm51-12Re-Blog – https://wp.me/p98Coa-CH
Scripture – Bible.com, ESV
Images – Google Images
References – What is godly Sorrow,  gotQuestions.org; Five Signs of Godly Sorrow. Ryan Huguley.com; Vine’s Expository Dictionary; Guilt and Repentance, Dr. Nicolas Ellen, Slideshare.com (Google Images); Praying God’s Prayers, Beth Moore

Thank you for visiting my Young Christian Warriors site and dailyinspiration-lisasthoughts.com.

 

What Is Your Jordan River?

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Everyone is challenged, the question is – how do we stand under the weight?

“Joshua Study – Faith and Courage for the Unknown” (Bible.com)

The land of Egypt was familiar to the Israelites, just as our current home and habits may be familiar to us. But God was calling the Israelites to leave their mediocrity and comfort and enter the radical unfamiliarity of Canaan, the Promised Land. As Christians, we must realize that our comfort is eternally insignificant, but our faith and trust in God will endure forever.

Is the unknown scary? Yes, it can be. But we must remember that our unknown is not God’s unknown. As the Creator of the universe, there is nothing that He does not already know, nor is there anything that He cannot do on our behalf. When God calls us to forsake our own agenda in order to follow Him, there are two specific concepts that we need for our journey:

1) The courage to move past our fears and any unexpected challenges that arise.

2) The faith to believe that God is good and He is for our good.

Just as God required the Israelites to trust in Him for His promise, we must also do the same. Faith is not merely a figment of imagination. On the contrary, it requires believing that God can be trusted and that He is the Provider of all good things. When our faith and trust lie with the Giver of the Promised Land instead of the land itself, we are protecting ourselves from unnecessary hurt and disappointment if things do not go according to “plan”.

Allow me to share two important points from the book of Joshua:

1. When God led the Israelites across the Jordan River into the Promised Land, He chose the harvest season, which means the banks were swollen and the waters were high. God chose the most difficult time possible for His people to pursue the promise. Why? Because He wanted to demonstrate His power and His faithfulness. Be aware that He may do the same in your own life.

2. As soon as the first foot (of one of the priests) touched the water of the Jordan, the river was split in half and the people crossed into Canaan.  What a breathtaking image to behold – the Levitical priests standing in the middle of the Jordan river holding up the Ark of the Covenant (a visual of God’s presence) while two million Israelites cross a dry river bed. God did the impossible for man and delivered on His promise. He will do the same for you and me as we choose to follow Him.